May 20, 2019

Starting a Streak

Filed under: Leadership,Life,Significance,Uncategorized — Nathan @ 5:51 am
Photo by Artem Sapegin on Unsplash

Photo by Artem Sapegin on Unsplash

Starting a Streak

A good friend just broke a long sobriety streak, one that was just shy of twenty years. To his credit, he immediately pushed through the emotion of it and owned up to the lapse, but I suspect he was crushed, breaking a streak that long. Feeling that he’d let down those who rely on and support him. Knowing he’d damaged the trust he’d built up.

Let’s face it – we love a good streak. We love numbers. The late Stephen Jay Gould of Harvard, a former professor of mine (for a class called Thinking About Thinking, one of my favorites of law school), wrote Questioning the Millennium, a little book that among other things delves into our obsession with numbers. Round numbers, big numbers…and streaks.

But rather than our focusing on the streak, and that it’s broken, I think the far better view is to look forward, to recognize that my friend now has the chance to start a new one. The reality is that the length of time isn’t really what matters. That’s all nice and well and good, but what really matters is this moment. Our past has shaped us, and maybe we’re living with the consequences. But the only thing we can control is right here, right now.

Jesus told the story of an employer hiring workers for a day’s work in the vineyard (Matthew chapter 20). The employer hired some workers in the morning, then another group during the day, and then finally another group was hired just before quitting time. The employer promised each the same pay, and everyone was fine with their deal until those who’d worked the full day found out about the latter groups and felt cheated. When they complained, the employer basically told them, Don’t worry about anybody else. I’m paying you what I promised.

I’ve always heard this in the context of salvation – that it doesn’t matter when we accept Christ, as long as we do at some point. The takeaway is getting there, whatever your age.

But I’m also struck that Jesus doesn’t bother asking what the late hires were doing all day. Maybe it was productive and worthwhile. Maybe not. All the story mentions is that eventually they went into the field for the harvest.

Similarly, Jesus turns the focus of the woman at the well to not sin any more. He didn’t dump on her with her past. Paul reminds us to forget what is behind. Wait! No guilt? No angst? Just…forget it?!

My point is this: tomorrow morning, you may be dragging not only yourself but also a bunch of baggage out of bed and into your day. It’s easy to do. Our actions, words, decisions, they have consequences. Regret is natural. Some of us carry guilt with pride.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Free yourself from what is behind. Look forward to what is ahead.

Start a new streak.

November 18, 2018

Reflections from the Iowa Speedway

I recently had the chance to speak in Iowa for Keltek, Incorporated. In addition to speaking on leadership concepts from The Mentor Leader, their Director of Sales & Marketing, Jesse Peters, asked me to speak on the unique platform we each enjoy, which is one of my favorite topics. The basic concept of “platform” is that each of us has a unique sphere of influence that no one else can fill in the way we can.

No one.

Iowa SpeedwayAmong those in attendance that day at the Iowa Speedway – what a unique place to speak! – included everyone first responders from Iowa State Highway Patrol officers, EMS technicians, a couple of fire chiefs, several sheriffs, and numerous deputies, as well as the installers that outfit first responders’ vehicles in the workshop, receptionists and other administrative assistants.

The beauty of platform is that everyone from Tim Tebow to Tony Dungy, Oprah, the Governor of Iowa, and my retired next door neighbor all have one. My platform may not be as significant as theirs from a numbers standpoint, but there are particular individuals on whom I can have a greater influence than any of those.

That’s true for all of us. There are people we interact with, sometimes under our own roof, sometimes outside, who we can impact – for better or worse – in a unique way. As I spoke on this topic, I looked out into that crowd of first responders and others, and was again reminded that while I may have been onstage, they were going to go out and impact the world around them in a way that I never will.

And they got it. From Kelly and Jamie Milligan of Keltek to the other attendees there from all parts of Iowa (and some beyond), they got it.

Keep that in mind as you move through your week. You may wish your platform was bigger, or be frustrated or unfulfilled with your current situation. But don’t lose heart! Like it or not, there are people watching, people in need of a friendly word or a hand up, that Oprah, my neighbor or I can’t reach.

But you can.Iowa Capitol

July 12, 2018

Belgium’s Red Devils

It’s true – I’ve been watching this year’s World Cup. Watching a lot of it. Of course, other than now knowing the term “set piece” and appreciating the cleanliness of the Japanese and Senegalese fans, I must confess to still not grasping the intricacies of the game.

But one thing is clear; teamwork is critical.

I was fascinated to see the comments of Roberto Martinez, the coach of Belgium’s team (the “Red Devils”), on the necessity of his squad to work as a unit. “Individual skills and talent are important, but in these tournaments, it’s absolutely necessary to play as a team,” he said. “The last thing you want at international football is to see a group of individuals hoping to get a result.”

So true, not only in international football, but also in other sports, as well as corporations and any team settings. A team is completely different than a group of individuals.

Three points jumped out at me from the comments of Martinez, who led Belgium to the Cup semifinals:

  1. They needed the right roster configuration. As the late (American) football coach Denny Green said, “I want the right players on the roster, not necessarily the best players.” Martinez, likewise, spoke of needing the right mix of attackers, defenders and others, even if that meant some of the players who “grab the headlines” didn’t make the team.
  2. That roster configuration included diversity for the benefits it brings. Youth and young blood bring “bravery and naivety,” but Martinez also sought the benefits that veterans who had played in high stakes international competitions brought. Tony Dungy tackled this with his first Buccaneers coaching staff, hiring the blunt, fiery Herm Edwards as his Assistant Head Coach to complement Tony’s soft-spoken approach. Neither needed to become something they weren’t, but both needed to appreciate the other.
  3. Belgium had to become a team that could handle adversity. And the only way to learn to handle it is to experience it. “We must become a team that can suffer when it’s needed to be a winning team….” Martinez explained.  It’s certainly no fun when it’s happening, but it’s a part of growth. For the Red Devils, or your team. As my friend Jon Gordon notes, maintaining a spirit of positivity helps us press on through bad times.

So as you work within your team – and teams are all around us, in our families, businesses, churches, sports teams, and organizations (including my wife’s Junior League!) – remember Martinez’ words of wisdom. At the end of the day, teams can accomplish more, but only if they are a team – not merely a collection of individuals.

NW