February 27, 2020

Growth Requires Adversity

In the Spring of 1988, I was a freshman at Duke and immersed in the throes of a baseball campaign that saw us lose nineteen straight games on our way to a 10-37 record. (You know, if you take out the 19 then we were only 10-18, which really isn’t too bad…)

In the meantime, the Duke basketball team was having more success on the court than we were on the field. At least, until a dreadful late-season stretch of three straight losses that saw them drop from first place in the ACC to third and looking fourth square in the face with a final game against regular season champ North Carolina. The first two, losses to NC State and Georgia Tech, weren’t all that surprising, as both were solid teams. But those two were followed by a loss that allowed a dreadful Clemson team to climb out of the cellar.

Along with plenty of others, I wrote off the basketball team after those three losses, only to see them crush Carolina, win the ACC Tournament, then make a run to the Final Four before finally losing to eventual champion Kansas.

Eight straight wins at the most important time of the year after the three-loss swoon.

I was reminded of that long-ago reversal upon reading about Coach K’s recent comments following Duke’s loss to NC State the other day. Those comments, as captured by Ed Hardin in the Greensboro News & Record, contain a great deal of wisdom for sports and life.

“The game’s not over until you get feedback,” Coach K said. He went on to discuss the point of that feedback – learning and improving, and his strategy for doing so, starting with speaking to his team about attitude.

“Whenever there’s adversity, the single biggest gift that God has given you is attitude. You are in control of attitude. No one else. It’s on you.” Then, he said that there’s belief that springs from your attitude, and finally your belief leads to preparation and execution, which complete the cycle of improvement. 

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How we approach things mentally then allows us to put the sufficient effort and time into tackling what’s in front of us. And improving.

“You turn adversity of something that was bad into an opportunity that makes you better….Sometimes you need to get punched and knocked out. But then we get up, figure out why you got knocked out.”

Good stuff. Sometimes you need to get knocked out. Notice he didn’t say, “that stinks, but it’ll make us better.” No, an attitude that these challenges are good for our growth.

What do you know? Duke lost the next week to Wake Forest after these comments, a possibility Coach K entertained when he said that it was a cycle to be repeated as necessary. Knowing him, there’s a part of him that was pleased by the loss to Wake – another chance to grow.

Adversity leading to progress. Not in spite of adversity. Because of.

File that away for the next time life throws a punch. 

I will.